Recapturing the Articular Disc or Repositioning the Mandibular Condyle? What about Rethinking the Concept as the Recovery of the Physiological Relationship of the Head of the Mandible with the Articular Disc. Patients with a long history of pain. Case series. First Section.

Recapture the articular disc, repositioning the mandibular condyle?

What about rethinking the concept as the recovery of the physiological relationship of the mandible head with the articular disc ,WHEN IT IS POSSIBLE.

And when is it not possible? What is the differential diagnosis? WHAT CAN WE OFFER TO OUR PATIENTS?

What type of orthotic or intraoral device to use? What is the purpose of an orthotic  in a TMJ Pathology treatment? Repositioning the jaw, recapturing the articular discs? Is this always possible? DEPEND ON THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS!

Does it have changes in the articular structures of the temporomandibular joint?

Does it have distortions in the horizontal, vertical and transverse posture of the craniomandibular complex?

How are the bones?

How’s the cartilage?

How’s the articular disk?

How are the muscles in this system?

How is the cervical spine in relation to the whole system?

How is the relation of the vertebral column with the other parts of the system?

The teeth, the two temporomandibular joints and the postural musculature are parts of the same bone, the mandible. They are deeply interrelated and interdependent in growth, form, and function. An abnormality in one, profoundly affects the others.

1 frente

A 30-year-old female patient presents at the clinic with a history of headache, pain in the forehead, pain and stiffness in the nape of the neck, left eyebrow pain, pain behind the right eye, and pain in the right shoulder. The patient reports TMJ pain (temporomandibular joint) on the right side.

The patient reports bilateral crackling, non-specific facial pain, and muscle tremor, difficulty opening the mouth, difficulty in chewing and mandibular locking.

Summary report written by the patient:

I do not remember a sudden drop where there might have been some kind of injury.
At 6 years of age I was a gymnast. I always had falls, front, back and head. But there were protections on the floor.

Near 8 years old, I extract a molar from the lower left side. I think that from this I have always forced more chewing on the right side.

At approximately 13/14 years of age, I remember starting the cracks on the right side. On this side I had a cross bite and a deciduous canine that “bit” behind the lower tooth.

At this stage, the crackling became more frequent, causing a bit of difficulty to fully open the mouth.  When trying to open the mouth without the snap, the opening becomes smaller than after the click. That is, if I do not play with the jaw, the mouth does not open completely.

In 2004 I had the first “lockup”. I remember being in winter and cold. I tried to do the “game” of the jaw and I could not open the mouth. Then I forced myself to open my mouth and I felt a strong crack, followed by pain in the ear / nose. The impression was that it had displaced some bone / nerve.

From this episode, whenever I force more the region, the locking happens. Ex: when I eat meats, candy, peanuts. Things that I need to force when chewing.

In 2008 I put orthodontic appliance to make the corrections. In the treatment, I made a process of spacing the teeth, with a device in the roof of the mouth to open the arch. I kept my teeth apart for a while.

After finishing the treatment, corrected the teeth, the clicks returned lighter. Approximately 1 year later, the locking returned as well. I started with headaches and cervical pain. I felt slight tingling in the head.

In 2015 I started to hear some kind of “sand” on the left side. Then I got pregnant and in this period began the crackling also on the left side. In February 2017 I had the first “lock” on the left side.

Now when I feel the locking, I try to relax the muscles well, leaving the jaw loose for a few minutes. Sometimes it returns to normal anyway, other times I have to force it with the opening of the mouth, causing a strong crack.

2 foto inicial perfil

Current information:

When I close my mouth, I feel my jaw line back slightly, to “marry” the bite. To keep my mouth “loose” and comfortable, I have to snap both sides, and let the jaw loose.

When I try to open my mouth without the snaps, the opening becomes smaller than after the click. That is, if I do not play with the jaw, the mouth does not open completely.

Crashes usually occur:

– Yawning;

– In the morning (awake with the jaw locked);

– Eating meats.

2 tomo

CT: Part of the initial study of the patient sent before the consultation requested by another professional.

Anamnesis and clinical examination are a key part in the diagnosis of patients with TMJ pathology.

Computed tomography is an excellent image, but when we treat a synovial joint in a patient with TMJ pathologies, CT does NOT PROVIDE THE INFORMATION OF THE SOFT TISSUES.

Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (NMR) can give a lot of information and not just the position of the disk. It is essential to have the knowledge to KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH THIS INFORMATION.

We cannot treat a patient with mandible head necrosis or with medullary edema or arthrosis or rheumatoid arthritis or lupus in the same way that we treat another patient with only a wrong position of the jaw.

The temporomandibular joints of all these patients need to be decompressed, but that is only part of the problem.

3 dentes inicHabitual occlusion of the patient on the day of the consultation.

4 oclusaisUpper and lower occlusal views of the patient prior to treatment.

Orthodontic treatment contention wire is observed between the right and left lower canines.

5 panoramica

Initial panoramic radiograph of the patient before treatment.

Orthodontic treatment contention wire is observed between the right and left lower canines.

6 laminografia

The laminography of the temporomandibular joints shows a modification of the growth axis of the mandibular condyles in both the left and right caused by a traumatism in the early childhood, (fracture in green stick).

Retro position of both mandibular heads in the articular fossae.

TMJ laminography in habitual occlusion and open mouth.

cicatriz do queixoThree-dimensional asymmetries in the head of the condyle may have been caused by different etiologies and cause morphofunctional pathologies.

Changes in the orientation of the mandible head occur in patients who have suffered blows in the chin region, either anteroposterior, vertical or lateral. We can observe in these cases a deformation of the head of the mandible in the form of curvature, with an anterior concavity, which in some cases may be so important which produces a compression of the retrodiscal region, causing severe symptoms.

7 frontal

Frontal radiography of the patient in habitual occlusion before treatment.

Orthodontic treatment contention wire is observed between the right and left lower canines.

8 teleperfil

Lateral radiograph of the patient in habitual occlusion before treatment.

9 c 7Lateral and cervical radiograph of the patient in habitual occlusion before treatment. Note the loss of cervical lordosis and rectification of the cervical spine.

16 rnm inicial 1

MRI: sagittal slices of the left TMJ in the closed mouth before treatment. There is an anteroversion of the mandibular condyle. The mandibular head is in retro position.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, with reduction in maneuvers in open mouth.

Important retrodiscal compression.

17 rnm inicial 2

MRI: sagittal slices of the left TMJ in the closed mouth before treatment. There is an anteroversion of the mandibular condyle. The mandibular head is in retro position.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, with reduction in maneuvers in open mouth.

Important retrodiscal compression.

19 rnm inicial4

MRI: sagittal slices of the right TMJ in the closed mouth before treatment. There is an anteroversion of the mandibular condyle. The mandibular head is in retro position.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, with reduction in maneuvers in open mouth.

Important retrodiscal compression.

20 rnm dir inicial5

MRI: sagittal slices of the right TMJ in the closed mouth before treatment. There is an anteroversion of the mandibular condyle. The mandibular head is in retro position.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, with reduction in maneuvers in open mouth.

Important retrodiscal compression.

21 rnm inicial 6

MRI: sagittal slices of the right TMJ in the closed mouth before treatment. There is an anteroversion of the mandibular condyle. The mandibular head is in retro position.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, with reduction in maneuvers in open mouth.

Important retrodiscal compression.

22 frontal rnm inicial 7MRI: frontal slices of the right and the left temporomandibular joints, closed mouth in habitual occlusion before treatment.

The frontal slice of the right and left temporomandibular joint evidences a severe loss of joint space.

24 atm aberta24a eletromiografia dinãmica habitual rolos de algodão

Dynamic electromyography record of the patient in habitual occlusion and with cotton rolls on the right side (second column), left side (third column) and both right and left sides (fourth column).

Note the improvement in recruitment of motor units in the fourth column.

25 registro cineciografico inicial

Patient’s initial record for the construction of the DIO ( intraoral device)

To correctly evaluate the Maxilomandibular relationship we should begin to consider the physiological rest mandible position.

Physiological rest is a concept applicable to all the muscles of the body.

The stomatognathic musculature is no exception.

The patient’s masticatory muscles were deprogrammed electronically and a new physiological neuromuscular position at rest was recorded.

The patient has in this first record a pathological free space of 6,4 mm. 

The patient also presented a 0.4 mm  of mandibular retro position.

26 recalibraÇÃo da orteseRecalibration of the physiological neuromuscular position of the DIO (intraoral device)

In the first phase the intraoral devices are recalibrated and / or changed according to each specific case as the jaw, muscles and TMJ improve.

28 ortoseOcclusion of the patient with the DIO (intraoral device)

With the record obtained with the jaw tracker an intraoral device (DIO) was made to reposition the mandible three-dimensionally.

The PHYSIOLOGICAL NEUROMUSCULAR position was recorded in the form of an occlusal bite record, which was later used to make a DIO (intraoral device)

In the first phase the intraoral devices are recalibrated and / or changed according to each specific case as the jaw, muscles and TMJ improve.

29 controle da orteseAnother cinecigraphic record to control the DIO (intraoral device) in a physiological neuromuscular position as the device is changed or recalibrated.

The patient did not report any more symptomatology. The electromyography and kinesiography records objectively showed improvement of the neuromuscular function.

I asked for the second MRI (nuclear magnetic resonance) to objectively evaluate the physiological relationship between the mandibular condyles and the articular disc.

35 rnm comparativas 1RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same left TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

35b rnm comparativas 1RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same left TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

36 rnm comparativas 2RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same left TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

38 rnm comparativas 4RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same left TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

39 rnm comparativas 5

RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the rigt TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same right TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

40 rnm comparativas 6RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the rigt TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same right TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

41 rnm comparativas7RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the rigt TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same right TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

42 rnm comparativas 8RNM: Comparison of the sagittal slice of the rigt TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same right TMJ,  closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological relation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

43 frontal rnm comparativas 8

RNM: Comparison of the frontal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same left TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological refrontallation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

44 frontal rnm comparativas 8

RNM: Comparison of the frontal slice of the rigt TMJ, closed mouth, before the physiological neuromuscular treatment, and of the same right TMJ, closed mouth, after the FIRST PHASE of the treatment.

Recovery of the physiological refrontallation of the head of the mandible with the articular disc.

45 imagens

The patient did not report any more symptomatology. The comparative MRI showed the recovery of the physiological relationship of the mandible head with the articular disc.

The electromyographic and kinesiographic records objectively showed improvement of the neuromuscular function.

It was decided to start the SECOND PHASE of the treatment to remove the DIO (intraoral device), maintaining the neuromuscular physiological occlusion.

For this we use a three-dimensional orthodontic, where the teeth are erupted to the new physiological neuromuscular position.

46 depoimento 1Patient Testimony:

My first memory of locking joints was at age 15 or so.

I looked for orthodontic specialists; I made the necessary “adjustments”, but the locking and the pain still continued.

I looked for Dr. Lidia now at the age of 30, since other experts told me that only surgery would be possible in my case. And yet, without knowing exactly whether we would succeed.

After starting the first phase of treatment with the device, the pain ceased and never again I had the jaw locking that so frighten me.

47 depoimento 2

I adapted very easily to the treatment, I was and I am being much disciplined with the use of the device.

Now, as Dr. Lidia explained to me, with the discs already in the right place, we will pass for the second phase, for withdrawal of the device.

Today I’m having a routine without worry that I can “lock” at any time.

I’m very grateful to Dr. Lidia.

TMJ Study and Investigation Page. Three years of publication.

Dear friends,

At December 2014 I started the project TMJ Study and Investigation Page. At first, all its content was offered in three languages: Portuguese, English and Spanish. Due to the analysis of the webpage access statistics, at March 2015 I decided to offer the content solely in Portuguese and English.

Anyway, access to the contents of the page is still available to other researchers, professionals in the field and to those interested in the research that I develop.

Three years of publication

Nowadays, the medicine based on evidence is hierarchically stratified from top to bottom, where in the base of the pyramid we find the clinic cases, which are rarely seen as evidence.

The TMJ Study and Investigation Page had in its conception, the purpose of posting the clinic cases, which were carefully published with the documentation related to each of the patients treated at Clinica MY with pain complaints, dysfunction and TMJ pathology.

The proposition was of presenting these clinic cases and concepts in order share them, offering free access to the content along images, surface electromyographies, computerized kinesiography, scanned before and after the therapeutic process. Cases of tridimentional orthodontics and neuromuscular phisiologic reabilitation of the second phase of treatment, after the TMJ treatment, were also included.

FINAL

The TMJ Study and Investigation Page completed in the month of December, three years of life.

I remembered to celebrate on the first anniversary of the Page.

In the middle of the work with patients, teaching and publications I did not remember to celebrate the second year.

I want to celebrate these three years with you.

With this project, we have a place in the Internet that presents a line of work known as neuromuscular physiologic dentistry, which takes into account the whole body system. It is an area which acts on posture, mandibular functioning and considers the entire body system.

In order to do that, the neuromuscular physiologic dentistry aims to establish, in the patient, a position that is based on a harmonious relation between the muscles, the teeth, and the temporomandibular joints.

MARCUS LAZARI frontal E SAGITAL

In the publication of this year’s end I have chosen the most significant images of all these years of publications, with direct links to each of the original publications.

At the end of this publication I placed the links of the publications of the first year of this page.

3 ANOS DE PUBLICAÇÕES 2

The TMJ Study and Investigation Page  has grown tremendously and continues to receive visitors from all over the world.

Thank you!

Lidia Yavich

Temporomandibular Joint Pathology in a Patient with Congenital Fusion of two Cervical Vertebrae. First and Second Phase. Case Report.

33 FINAL

Postural Improvement in a Patient after Neuromuscular Physiological Mandible Repositioning Treatment. Patient with Scoliosis Surgery and Craniomandibular Symptomatology.

24

TMJ Pathologies Treatment: Patient with Severe Headaches and Temporomandibular Joint Pain with Significant Contour Irregularities in the Mandibular Condyle and Mouth Opening Limitation.

27 CEF COMPARATIVAS ingles

Reestablishment of the Bone Marrow Signal in a case of Avascular Necrosis of the Mandibular Head. Monitoring two years after treatment.

FRONTAL COMPARATIVAS ESQUERDA 2016

Neuromuscular Physiological Treatment in a Patient with Headache and Pain in the Temporomandibular Joints. Case report without possibility of Disc Recapture: first and second phase.

10 abre e fecha inicial

FINALE FINALE

TMJ Pathologies Treatment: Patient with Pain in the Back of the Head, Bilateral Tinnitus and Constant Teeth and Prosthesis Fracture. First and second phase. Case Report.

ITACIR COMBINADA

TMJ Pathologies Treatment: Patient with headache for 30 years. Neuromuscular Physiological Rehabilitation. First and second phase. Case Report.

1 FOTOS FRENTE

TMJ Pathology in Professional Musicians: A look beyond the risk factors. Physiological Neuromuscular Rehabilitation. First and second phase. Case Report.

HELLA

TMJ Study and Investigation Page. One year of publication

INITIAL

2

The TMJ Study and Investigation Page  has grown tremendously and continues to receive visitors from all over the world.

Thank you!

Lidia Yavich

Mandible Condyle Fracture Consolidation by Neurophysiological Alignment of the Segments, Four Months after Unsuccessful Surgery. Case report

Fractures of the mandibular condyle are one of the most commonly occurring mandibular fractures. Management of these fractures has always been a controversial issue. One of the complications of mandibular condyle fracture is nonunion.

This case report documents a 57-year-old male patient with a complication nonunion of the left mandibular condyle 4 months after surgery and the resolution of this case with a neurophysiological alignment of the segments, without a new surgery or internal fixation.

1 AA 57 year-old male patient was referred to the clinic by his dentist. His principal complaints were lack of strength when chewing, difficulty in opening the mouth, cervical pain, pain in the TMJs and ringing in the left ear.

Past history revealed that the patient fell in the bathroom 4 months before the consultation, hitting his jaw and fracturing his mandible. He was subsequently surgically treated for fracture of the symphysis and the left mandibular condyle.

Extra oral examination did not reveal any obvious swelling. 1 BAfter performing all the clinical evaluations a panoramic radiograph was solicited where the nonunion of the left condyle was noticed.

Dental abnormalities included missing 14, 36 and 46 and a posterior open bite on the left side.

Panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation showing a nonunion of the left condyle.

Asymmetric mandibular condyles. Radiopaque image compatible with osteosynthesis wire in the lower region of condylar apophysis on the left side with bone fragment displacement.

In the region of the chin on the right, horizontal radiopaque images compatible with osteosynthesis devices for contention of the fracture of the anterior mentonian symphysis.

2 condilo inicial Magnification of the left mandibular condyle on the panoramic radiograph.

3 LAMINOGRAFIA INICIAL

TMJ laminography of the patient on the day of consultation showing the nonunion fracture of the left mandibular condyle 4 months after surgery.

A  CT was solicited to get a more accurate diagnosis.

4 CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA INICIAISCT sagital slices confirming the total nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery.        

4AA CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA INICIAIS   CT frontal slices confirming the total nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery.               5 3D da fratura  3D reconstruction showing the total  nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery .        6 3D transparencia da fraturaAnother 3D reconstruction showing the total  nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery .        7 A ELETROMIOGRAFI inicial  Surface electromyographic record before electronic deprogramming on the first consultation: elevated activity of the right masseter, right trapezius and right digastric at rest. All this masticatory muscles lowered after electronic deprogramming.7 B ELETROMIOGRAFIA após demaDecreased masticatory muscle activity at rest after  electronic deprogramming.7 Cc ELETROMIOGRAFIA comparativas ante e apos desprogramação Comparative rest electromyography records before and after electronic deprogramming.

Based on the case history it´s clinical and radiographic features, this case was diagnosed as nonunion fracture of the left mandibular condyle . Nonunion is a complication in mandibular fractures. The causative factors include delay in treatment, infection, inadequate immobilization, and improper internal fixation; concomitant infection may be present.

Other suspected contributory factors include failure to provide antibiotics, delay in treatment, teeth in the fracture line, alcohol and drug abuse, inexperience of the surgeon, and lack of patient compliance.

Generally treatment of nonunion consists of standard techniques of debridement, antibiotic therapy and further immobilization.1 A

We referred the patient back to the surgeon where a new surgery was proposed.

THE PATIENT ABSOLUTELY REFUSED TO HAVE A NEW SURGERY

Considering the categorical decision of not performing a new surgery the patient returned to the clinic and a conservative approach to treatment was proposed. The patient was informed about possible limitations due to his age.

Analyzing the alternatives  he accepted the clinic’s proposal.

8 REGISTRO INICIALUltra low frequency and low amplitude, transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (TENS) of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (V) was used to relax the masticatory muscles to record the rest position of the mandible.

That tridimentional mandible rest position was recorded in the form of a bite occlusal registration, which was later used to fabricate a Intraoral device. This is a removable mandibular appliance that in this case must be worn during day and night by the patient. This intraoral appliance, tested electromiographically and magne­tographically, support this neurophysiological position.

9 0clusão com o DIO

The patient was asked to wear the intraoral appliance full time. The dynamic evaluations improved and the patient felt no more pain, and no difficulty to chew.

During the treatment  new intraoral device in neurophysiological position was constructed.10  0clusão com o 2 DIOA second panoramic radiograph was solicited after three months. The new panoramic radiograph showed the improvement of the condyle position and finally, four months after this control a third panoramic radiograph was solicited where we can see the union of the fracture. 11 comparação de panorâmicas Comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.

LOOK THE UPRIGHTING OF THE WIRE FROM THE SURGERY.

11Aa comparação de panorâmicas E OCLUSÃO Comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.

The frontal images of the habitual occlusion on the consultation day, four and seven months after initiating the treatment are also posted.

11AB comparação de panorâmicas com inversãoLOOK THE UPRIGHTING OF THE WIRE FROM THE SURGERY.

COLOR INVERSION of the comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.12 CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA FINAIS A new CT was solicited and clearly showed the union of the fracture, without submitting the patient to a new surgery and   without using any maxillomandibular fixation (MMF)  15 3D comparativas3D reconstruction showing the nonunion of the left mandibular condyle after four months surgery and the later union of the mandibular condyle after neurophysiological treatment.

Fractures where the muscles tend to draw fragments together are more favorable than those fractures where the muscles tend to draw fragments apart.

The displacement of fracture fragments is observed in mandibular condyle fractures. The most commonly observed type is the displacement of the condyle head to the anteromedial side because of lateral pterygoid muscle action.

The ability to place the mandible in a spatial relationship by measuring the masticatory muscles at their rest length can be an important auxiliary tool to assist in the recuperation of condylar fractures.

cartaz1 modificado cartazII modificado