TMJ Pathologies in Children and Teenagers the Overlooked Diagnosis

The work that is been presented in this publication won the third place in the clinical table presentation in the congress of the IAO (International Association for Orthodontics) April 2012, entitled – TMJ Pathologies in Children and Teenagers, the Overlooked Diagnosis.

At the same congress I presented a more extensive conference on the mentioned subject.

I presented this paper at a congress that bring together orthodontists and orthopedists from around the world. The intention was to make them aware about TMJ pathologies in children and teenagers even in cases apparently simples that we can see in our clinics, where the TMJ can be compromised.The evaluation of the TMJ and the diagnosis of its pathologies should be an inseparable part of our procedures, not only in orthodontics and orthopedics but in all areas of dentistry.

I had presented in this page several cases with the first and second phases completed.

In this publication I WILL PRESENT ONLY THE FIRS PHASEas it was presented in the clinical table and in the lecture.

Nowadays the patient is already in an advanced stage of the second phase.

THE IMPORTANT SUBJECT  IN THIS PUBLICATION IS THE STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENTS ACHIEVED IN THIS FIRST PHASE.

1 Female patient, 14 years of age comes to consultation with complaints of pain in the lower teeth, shoulder pain and TMJ clicking on the left side.

Aesthetic correction is an important issue  for the patient, but she and her mother were also  concerned with the  pain in the lower teeth and the noise generated by the click. 

2 dentes The occlusion of the patient suggests a case without major difficulty, a simple case.

In this case could be very easy to evaluate and diagnose the need for superior expansion for the accommodation and advancement of the mandible, and afterwards the vertical deficiency.3 oclusais Often when we analyze a case for orthodontic correction, we can list the possible etiological factors that led the patient to this situation.

When evaluating a functional failure we must take into account ALL THE ETIOLOGIC FACTORS INVOLVED IN THIS DYSFUNCTION.4 panoramica Patient’s initial panoramic radiograph before treatment.5 lateral cervical Patient’s initial lateral and cervical spine radiograph before treatment.

Besides the rectification of the cervical spine we can notice the start of an inversion of the physiological curvature from C4.6 frontalPatient’s initial frontal radiograph before treatment.7 cefalometria Cephalometry is a very important part in the diagnosis and correction of clinical cases, both in orthodontics as in orthopedics, BUT it is not an exam to show pathology of temporomandibular joints.8 laminografiaThe laminography of the temporomandibular joints in closed and open mouth is considered as the panoramic radiograph for the temporomandibular joints.

It cannot be compared to a CT scan of the temporomandibular joints, but it is a basic examination for the first information on TMJ.8 laminografia corIn this same image with color highlight, we can appreciate the retroposition of the left TMJ, the change in the growth axis of this same side and the loss of joint space on both sides.

The patient reports a traumatism when she was child “I hit the neck, near to the chin, playing on the bedside table”.9 ampliação laminografiaLaminography image magnification with highlight color, closed mouth, right and left side.10 ampliação laminografiaThis image magnification from the temporomandibular joints in closed mouth; right and left sides, DOES NOT SHOW THE ARTICULAR DISC CONDITION NOR THE LIGAMENTS.12 ressonancia When the patient comes for consultation with some sort of dysfunction, the professional treatment should be directed to the restoration of normal function, when possible.

To know what normal function is, we must understand that ANATOMY IS THE PLATFORM WHERE PHYSIOLOGY PERFORMS.

13 ressonancia It is necessary to know the functional anatomy of any part of our body to understand the physiopathology of any part of our body.

14 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment:

Mild irregularity of the bone cortical.

Anterior dislocation of the articular disc.

REMEMBER: THIS IS THE TMJ of a 14-year-old teenager.

She had no crepitation NOR PAIN IN the TMJ, only a click.

I have often read different views of colleagues expressing that the image information knowledge would not change anything, since it would not alter the procedures to be followed in the treatment.

15 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment;

Other slice of the same MRI:

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment:

Mild irregularity of the bone cortical.

Anterior dislocation of the articular disc.

REMEMBER: THIS IS THE TMJ of a 14-year-old teenager.

She had no crepitation NOR PAIN IN the TMJ, only a click.

I have often read different views of colleagues expressing that the image information knowledge would not change anything, since it would not alter the procedures to be followed in the treatment.

16 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment:

Other slice of the same MRI:

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment:

Mild irregularity of the bone cortical.

Anterior dislocation of the articular disc.

REMEMBER: THIS IS THE TMJ of a 14-year-old teenager.

She had no crepitation NOR PAIN IN the TMJ, only a click.

I have often read different views of colleagues expressing that the image information knowledge would not change anything, since it would not alter the procedures to be followed in the treatment.

17 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Superior flattening, anterior marginal osteofhyte.

Anterior dislocation of the articular disc.

REMEMBER: THIS IS THE TMJ of a 14-year-old teenager.

She had no crepitation NOR PAIN IN the TMJ, only a click.

I have often read different views of colleagues expressing that the image information knowledge would not change anything, since it would not alter the procedures to be followed in the treatment.

20 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Other slice of the same MRI:

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Superior flattening, anterior marginal osteofhyte.

Anterior dislocation of the articular disc.

REMEMBER: THIS IS THE TMJ of a 14-year-old teenager.

She had no crepitation NOR PAIN IN the TMJ, only a click.

I have often read different views of colleagues expressing that the image information knowledge would not change anything, since it would not alter the procedures to be followed in the treatment.

21

When the patient comes to our clinic with some sort of dysfunction the treatment should be directed to the restoration of normal function.

How could this professional succeed if he  doesn not understand what is a normal function.

Remember ANATOMY IS THE PLATFORM WHERE PHYSIOLOGY PERFORMS.

When a patient like this, presents damage in the cortical bone and also in the articular disc and its ligaments, the question should be: CAN I IMPROVE THIS SITUATION?

If the answer is positive, it is important to document it in an objective way, in order to inform the colleagues that are always eager to learn and are not afraid to change paradigms. IF WE CAN NOT IMPROVE THIS SITUATION because of the sequels of different etiologies, we need to analise if we can improve our patient’s life quality and we also must inform the patient about the difficulties and limitations of each case.

22 Remember that systemic diseases, traumatism, infections, damage to the site of growth, muscle balance disruption, can have a profound influence on the craniofacial complex during this critical growth phase.23 eletromiografia inicial Initial dynamic electromyography record in habitual occlusion. We ask to the patient to open the mouth, clench strong and swallow. In this record we can observe that the patient cannot maintain the strength in clenching, even that she was instructed to close the mouth and not to open before we ask her to do that.24 registro magnetografico Her masticatory muscles where electronically deprogrammed and a bite record  in neurophysiological position was registered using a jaw tracker.

Remember that the information obtained from the images and that the  individualized objectives for each clinical case should always be taken into account in the bite registration.

The patient had a pathological free space of 4.3 mm and a retro position of 2.1 mm

This record is three-dimensional.

25 DIOWith this data we can construct a DIO (intraoral device). This device must be tested electromiographically to represent the ideal position of the muscles.26 eletromiografia DIO Dynamic electromyography record with the intraoral device in neurophysiological position. In this record we can see that the patient can maintain the strength of the bite, and that she increased the strenght of the masseters  and balanced  both digastric.27 ELETROS COMPARATIVAS Comparison of the SEMG records of the patient, the first in habitual occlusion and the second with the intraoral device in neurophysiological position.28 perfil comparativas Standing posture (orthostatic position) right side, sagittal plane:

Trunk antepulsion position improved;

Improvement of the shoulder anterior rotation;

It seems that the shoulder blades are flat, more neutral;

In the first photograph, in habitual occlusion, it can be observed a rectification of  the physiological curvature in the cervical spine. On the second photograph we can see an improvement of the physiological curvature.

The head position is more balanced, closer to the proper alignment of the center of gravity where the neck flexors seem to be less contracted.

30 c7 comparativasPatient’s lateral and cervical spine comparison: in habitual occlusion and in neurophysiological occlusion.

Improvement  of the cervical spine physiological curve.

Increase of the  intervertebral spaces.31 comparativas do perfil Patient’s lateral radiographs with the profile comparison: in habitual occlusion and in neurophysiological occlusion.

Recovery of the lower facial height.32 lamino comparativas TMJ laminographies comparison: in habitual occlusion and in neurophysiological occlusion. Observe the decompression of the  temporomandibular joints.33 lamino comparativas COR In the same image with color highlight, we can better observe the decompression of the temporomandibular joints and compare it with the laminography in habitual occlusion.34 lamino comparativas COR AMPLIADAS Comparative images of TMJ laminographies magnification: in habitual occlusion and neurophysiological occlusion. Right and left TMJ, closed mouth.35 lamino comparativas COR AMPLIADAS PROVISORIASLaminography image magnification with highlight color, closed mouth. Right  and left TMJ in neurophysiological position.

This image, EVEN THAT IT IS SHOWING THE JOINT DECOMPRESSION, DOES NOT PROVE THE ARTICULAR DISC RECAPTURE, NOR PROVES THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE IRREGULARITIES ON THE CORTICAL BONE OBSERVED IN THE INITIAL PATIENT’S MRI.

LET’S REMEMBER THE IMAGES OF THE INITIAL MRI

14 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment.

36 RNM AFTER TREATMENT

Comparative MRI images, left TMJ closed mouth, after the first phase of the treatment

Observe the good relation between the mandible head and the articular disc.

Observe the positive remodeling of the cortical bone.

LET’S REMEMBER THE IMAGES OF THE INITIAL MRI

15 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment.

39 RNM AFTER TREATMENT 2

Comparative MRI images, left TMJ closed mouth, after the first phase of the treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment

Observe the good relation between the mandible head and the articular disc.

Observe the positive remodeling of the cortical bone.

LET’S REMEMBER THE IMAGES OF THE INITIAL MRI

16 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s left TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment.

40 RNM AFTER TREATMENT

Comparative MRI images, left TMJ closed mouth, after the first phase of the treatment.

Observe the good relation between the mandible head and the articular disc.

Observe the positive remodeling of the cortical bone.

LET’S REMEMBER THE IMAGES OF THE INITIAL MRI

17 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

42 RNM AFTER TREATMENT

Comparative MRI images, right TMJ closed mouth, after the first phase of the treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment.Observe the good relation between the mandible head and the articular disc.

Observe the positive remodeling of the cortical bone.

LET’S REMEMBER THE IMAGES OF THE INITIAL MRI

20 ressonancia

MRI: patient’s right TMJ closed mouth before treatment.

Comparative MRI images after the first phase of the treatment.

44 RNM AFTER TREATMENT

Comparative MRI images, right TMJ closed mouth, after the first phase of the treatment.

Observe the good relation between the mandible head and the articular disc.

Observe the positive remodeling of the cortical bone.

Nowadays the patient is already in an advanced stage of the second phase.

In this image we have a third MRI that was not presented at the IAO Congress.

The structures continue to improve.

46 3 RIGHT TMJ

Right TMJ closed mouth sagittal slices comparison: initial, after the first phase of treatment and in the control of the second phase still not completed.

 In this image we have a third MRI that was not presented at the IAO Congress.

47 LEFT TMJ

Left TMJ closed mouth sagittal slices comparison: initial, after the first phase of treatment and in the control of the second phase still not completed.

The structures continue to improve.

The evaluation of the TMJ and the diagnosis of its pathologies should be an inseparable part of our procedures, not only in orthodontics and orthopedics but in all areas of dentistry.

We need to know:

Has the TMJ  a pathologic condition?

If positive, which structures are damaged?

How this condition can influence the joint  function and  the future of the patien’s joint?

Do I have the possibilty to give to the patient the condition to heal the damaged structures or to improve them?

The target is to bring this structures the closer we can to a healthy function, when possible.

Is this always possible? OF COURSE NOT, but when  it is possible, the structures must be repaired.

Logically, differential diagnosis allow us a prognosis: favorable or not. favorable.

NOT ALL THE ARTHROPATHIES WILL HAVE THE RESULT WE HAD IN THIS CASE, BUT PROGNOSIS IS ALSO A PIECE IN THE INITIAL DIAGNOSIS that must include all the systems involved.

The importance of Mandibular Rest Position by Electronic Deprogramming in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Pathologies, Orthodontic Diagnosis and Oral Rehabilitation. Case report.

1 frontal  Male patient 42 years old arrived to the clinic referring a strong complaint because of  the wear in his upper and  lower arch teeth, frequent breakage of teeth, intense bruxism, shoulder pain and pain in the cervical spine.2 perfil The patient reports an aesthetic problem in his appearance in relation to his frontal  and  profile semblance, and emphasizes that his teeth “are almost over.”3 DENTES In the image of the patient’s habitual occlusion we can observe the intense wear of the upper and lower teeth, especially the anterior sector.

The patient had consulted a colleague to replace an adhesive fixed prosthesis. This colleague,  Dr. Joao Souza  was then attending the TMJ  Pathologies Megarresidency program in our clinic in Porto Alegre.

Dr. Joao Souza while looking at the profile, occlusion and wear condition of the teeth, suggested a consultation in our clinic for an evaluation of both the TMJ and also  the non-surgical possibilities within the neurophysiological philosophy.

The patient had already a scheduled orthognathic surgery, but still considered interesting to make another assessment of his clinic case.4 OCLUSAL Analizing the occlusal view we can better see the high degree of wear and tear of the anterior upper and lower teeth.5 PANORAMICA INICIAL We can observe in the panoramic radiograph the absence of the dental elements 17, 15, 26, 28, 37, 36 and 45.

The elements 38 and 47 are endodontically  treated.6 LAMINOGRAFIA Patient’s TMJ laminography in habitual occlusion: we can observe the inferior and posterior positioning of the articular process on the left side, in the articular fossa, when the jaw is in maximal intercuspal position.

In the maximum opening position we can observe the flattening of the anterior surface of the right articular process. We can also observe the anterior angulation of the articular process, on the left side, with the flattening of its posterior and upper anterior surface.7 PERFIL E ROSTO Lateral radiograph in conjunction with the profile image of the patient before the treatment. This images highlight the aesthetic problem that afflicts the patient.8 FRONTAL INICIAL Patient’s frontal radiograph before treatment.9 C7 INICIAL Patient’s lateral radiograph and cervical spine before treatment.10 ELETROMIOGRAFIA INICIAL ANTES DO DEM Electromyographic record before electronic deprogramming in the first consultation: slightly elevated activity of the left masseter muscle  and both digastrics muscles at rest.

All these masticatory muscles lowered their values after the electronic deprogramming.11 ELETROMIOGRAFIA INICIAL APÓS DEM In this record we can see a decrease in the activity of masticatory muscles at rest after the electronic deprogramming.12 ELETROMIOGRAFIA INICIAIS COMPARATIVASComparative electromyographic records before and after electronic deprogramming of the patient first consultation.7 PERFIL E ROSTOAfter the mandibular electronic deprogramming, it was verified the pathological increase of the interocclusal free space. This information, along all the auxiliary diagnostic tests, allowed us to propose a non-surgical neurophysiological treatment for the patient.

First we needed to locate the jaw in balance with the muscles with a DIO (intraoral device) built in neurophysiological position.

Subsequently we needed to perform a three-dimensional orthodontics to maintain the neurophysiological position in conjunction with a neurophysiological rehabilitation while maintaining the muscle equilibrium  initially obtained. For this it is essential to measure and control the patient in each and all of these phases.

In this patient specific clinic case  the recovery of the free interocclusal space would provide very good aesthetic and functional result!

IT IS NOT IN ALL CASES that surgery can be avoided (EACH CASE IS A CASE) and even similar cases require a personalized assessment and a unique study.

The patient was informed of all treatment stages and analyzing all the alternatives the patient accepted our clinical proposal.

An MRI, (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) to analyze the disk and ligaments  condition of the TMJ, (temporomandibular joint) was requested. The MRI revealed that the discs and ligaments were in good health.

13 a It was used neural transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) in the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (V) to relax the masticatory muscles and record the rest position of the jaw.

The patient had a pathological free space of 8 mm and a retrusion of 3.8 mm.

This three-dimensional mandibular rest position had been recorded in the form of an occlusal bite registration, which was later used to construct a DIO (intraoral device).13 Registration for the recalibration of the DIO (intraoral device) during the first phase of the neurophysiological treatment.14 ORTESE RECALIBRADA The DIO (intraoral device) is a removable mandibular device which in this case must be used during the day and night by the patient, including in the meals. This oral appliance is tested electromyographically and magnetographically to support this neurophysiological position.15 PERFIS COMPARATIVOSPatient profile images in habitual occlusion and in neurophysiological occlusion with the DIO (intraoral device) in mouth. 16 FRONTAL COMPARATIVOSPatient frontal images in habitual occlusion and in neurophysiological occlusion with the DIO (intraoral device) in mouth.19 PANORAMICA PREPARO PARA IMPLANTES 1Patient’s panoramic radiograph shows the orthodontic preparation for the installation of dental implants.19b PANORAMICA IMPLANTES 1Patient’s panoramic radiograph after the placement of first dental implants.20 ORTO 1After the placement of the dental implants I began the orthodontic movement for reconstruction of the anterior teeth with composite resin.21 REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTESAfter the anterior movement of the anterior teeth the braces were temporarily removed to allow the reconstruction of the teeth with composite resin.

This rehabilitation was performed by Dr. Joao Souza following all the neurophysiological protocols.22 ORTESE NOVA REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTESAfter the reconstruction with composite resin of the anterior sector, the orthodontic appliance was reinstalled and a new DIO (intraoral device) was constructed in neurophysiological position.

The adhesive prosthesis of the lower right sector was removed and an implant was installed.15b RADIOGRAFIAS LATERAIS COMPARATIVASPatient’s comparative lateral radiographs in habitual occlusion before treatment and in neurophysiological occlusion during treatment.16 bRADIOGRAFIAS FRONTAL COMPARATIVASPatient’s comparative frontal radiographs in habitual occlusion before treatment and in neurophysiological occlusion during treatment.17 LAMINOGRAFIAS CONTROLEThe TMJ laminography in neurophysiological occlusion shows the inferior and anterior positioning of the articular processes in the articular fossa when the jaw is in maximal intercuspal position.18 LAMINOGRAFIAS COMPARATIVASTMJ comparative laminographies: before and during neurophysiological treatment.24 ORTESE NOVA REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTES 2 Sequence of the orthodontic treatment: preparation for the installation of the lower prosthetic implant.25 ORTESE NOVA REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTES 3 Installation of the provisional element in the lower implant and the brace placement on the same element.26 ORTESE NOVA REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTES 4 Sequence of orthodontic treatment for the active eruption of the posterior sectors.27 ORTESE NOVA REABILITAÇÃO E ORTO E IMPLANTES 5   Sequence of the orthodontic treatment for alignment and leveling of the lower anterior teeth for reconstruction with composite resin.28 ORTO 6 Sequence of the orthodontic treatment for alignment and leveling of the lower anterior teeth for reconstruction with composite resin.30  Finalization of all the phases of the neurophysiological treatment.30b Upper and lower occlusal view in the finalization of the neurophysiological treatment.31 COMP Comparative images of the patient’s occlusion before and after the neurophysiological treatment.31B Comparative images of the patient’s upper and lower occlusal views before and after the neurophysiological treatment.32 panoramicas comparativasComparative panoramic radiographs: before treatment and after the neurophysiological treatment, that included  the first phase, the three-dimensional orthodontics and the neurophysiological rehabilitation.

In the course of the treatment it was decided to install two posterior implants The lower due to an infectious process in the third molar, on the right, and the other implant, superior, on the same side, to better support the joint.33 laminografias comparativasPatient’s TMJ comparative laminographies: before, during and after neurophysiological treatment.34teles comparativasPatient’s lateral comparative radiographs: before, during and after neurophysiological treatment.35 frontais comparativos 22 Patient’s frontal comparative images: before, during and after neurophysiological treatment.36 perfis comparativos 2Patient’s profile comparative images: before, during and after neurophysiological treatment.37 posterThe importance of Mandibular Rest Position by Electronic Deprogramming in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Pathologies, Orthodontic Diagnosis and Oral Rehabilitation. Case report.38 depoimento

I had already decided to have surgery for facial correction due to various problems such as wear of the teeth, bruxism, tingling, physical imbalance, pain and bad appearance.

In a consultation for a small dental procedure with Dr. Joao Souza, I was advised by him to get in contact with Dr. Lidia Yavich for a consultation in order to see if there was any chance, in my case, to avoid surgery and solve the problems I was having.

In the first consultation that I had with Dr. Lidia Yavich I was introduced to a facial and dental correction technique that gave me more security than surgery.

Dr. Lidia stated that THERE WERE CASES WHERE SURGERY WAS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, but that in my case there could be another alternative.

So, I started the treatment, and THAT really changed my daily life completely. Today I am very happy with the result achieved and the quality of life provided due to the disappearance of the above-reported symptoms.

I would like to place on record that in addition to the professionalism of the entire team of Clinica MY, especially Dr. Lidia, I had the privilege to make great friendships with special people, that will always be a part of my life. I also want to leave a special thanks to Dr.  Joao Souza, that with his recommendation made all this possible because he always strives for quality and the well-being of his patients.

Mandible Condyle Fracture Consolidation by Neuromuscular physiological Alignment of the Segments, Four Months after Unsuccessful Surgery. Case report

Fractures of the mandibular condyle are one of the most commonly occurring mandibular fractures. Management of these fractures has always been a controversial issue. One of the complications of mandibular condyle fracture is nonunion.

This case report documents a 57-year-old male patient with a complication nonunion of the left mandibular condyle 4 months after surgery and the resolution of this case with a neurophysiological alignment of the segments, without a new surgery or internal fixation.

1 AA 57 year-old male patient was referred to the clinic by his dentist. His principal complaints were lack of strength when chewing, difficulty in opening the mouth, cervical pain, pain in the TMJs and ringing in the left ear.

Past history revealed that the patient fell in the bathroom 4 months before the consultation, hitting his jaw and fracturing his mandible. He was subsequently surgically treated for fracture of the symphysis and the left mandibular condyle.

Extra oral examination did not reveal any obvious swelling. 1 BAfter performing all the clinical evaluations a panoramic radiograph was solicited where the nonunion of the left condyle was noticed.

Dental abnormalities included missing 14, 36 and 46 and a posterior open bite on the left side.

Panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation showing a nonunion of the left condyle.

Asymmetric mandibular condyles. Radiopaque image compatible with osteosynthesis wire in the lower region of condylar apophysis on the left side with bone fragment displacement.

In the region of the chin on the right, horizontal radiopaque images compatible with osteosynthesis devices for contention of the fracture of the anterior mentonian symphysis.

2 condilo inicial Magnification of the left mandibular condyle on the panoramic radiograph.

3 LAMINOGRAFIA INICIAL

TMJ laminography of the patient on the day of consultation showing the nonunion fracture of the left mandibular condyle 4 months after surgery.

A  CT was solicited to get a more accurate diagnosis.

4 CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA INICIAISCT sagital slices confirming the total nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery.        

4AA CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA INICIAIS   CT frontal slices confirming the total nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery.               5 3D da fratura  3D reconstruction showing the total  nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery .        6 3D transparencia da fraturaAnother 3D reconstruction showing the total  nonunion of the mandibular condyle fracture four months after surgery .        7 A ELETROMIOGRAFI inicial  Surface electromyographic record before electronic deprogramming on the first consultation: elevated activity of the right masseter, right trapezius and right digastric at rest. All this masticatory muscles lowered after electronic deprogramming.7 B ELETROMIOGRAFIA após demaDecreased masticatory muscle activity at rest after  electronic deprogramming.7 Cc ELETROMIOGRAFIA comparativas ante e apos desprogramação Comparative rest electromyography records before and after electronic deprogramming.

Based on the case history it´s clinical and radiographic features, this case was diagnosed as nonunion fracture of the left mandibular condyle . Nonunion is a complication in mandibular fractures. The causative factors include delay in treatment, infection, inadequate immobilization, and improper internal fixation; concomitant infection may be present.

Other suspected contributory factors include failure to provide antibiotics, delay in treatment, teeth in the fracture line, alcohol and drug abuse, inexperience of the surgeon, and lack of patient compliance.

Generally treatment of nonunion consists of standard techniques of debridement, antibiotic therapy and further immobilization.1 A

We referred the patient back to the surgeon where a new surgery was proposed.

THE PATIENT ABSOLUTELY REFUSED TO HAVE A NEW SURGERY

Considering the categorical decision of not performing a new surgery the patient returned to the clinic and a conservative approach to treatment was proposed. The patient was informed about possible limitations due to his age.

Analyzing the alternatives  he accepted the clinic’s proposal.

8 REGISTRO INICIALUltra low frequency and low amplitude, transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (TENS) of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (V) was used to relax the masticatory muscles to record the rest position of the mandible.

That tridimentional mandible rest position was recorded in the form of a bite occlusal registration, which was later used to fabricate a Intraoral device. This is a removable mandibular appliance that in this case must be worn during day and night by the patient. This intraoral appliance, tested electromiographically and magne­tographically, support this neurophysiological position.

9 0clusão com o DIO

The patient was asked to wear the intraoral appliance full time. The dynamic evaluations improved and the patient felt no more pain, and no difficulty to chew.

During the treatment  new intraoral device in neurophysiological position was constructed.10  0clusão com o 2 DIOA second panoramic radiograph was solicited after three months. The new panoramic radiograph showed the improvement of the condyle position and finally, four months after this control a third panoramic radiograph was solicited where we can see the union of the fracture. 11 comparação de panorâmicas Comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.

LOOK THE UPRIGHTING OF THE WIRE FROM THE SURGERY.

11Aa comparação de panorâmicas E OCLUSÃO Comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.

The frontal images of the habitual occlusion on the consultation day, four and seven months after initiating the treatment are also posted.

11AB comparação de panorâmicas com inversãoLOOK THE UPRIGHTING OF THE WIRE FROM THE SURGERY.

COLOR INVERSION of the comparative image of the left mandibular condyle of the first panoramic radiograph of the patient on the day of consultation (4A), second panoramic radiograph three months after (4B) and third panoramic radiograph (4C) four months after the second control showing the improvement of condyle position and the union bone.12 CORTES DE TOMOGRAFIA FINAIS A new CT was solicited and clearly showed the union of the fracture, without submitting the patient to a new surgery and   without using any maxillomandibular fixation (MMF)  15 3D comparativas3D reconstruction showing the nonunion of the left mandibular condyle after four months surgery and the later union of the mandibular condyle after neurophysiological treatment.

Fractures where the muscles tend to draw fragments together are more favorable than those fractures where the muscles tend to draw fragments apart.

The displacement of fracture fragments is observed in mandibular condyle fractures. The most commonly observed type is the displacement of the condyle head to the anteromedial side because of lateral pterygoid muscle action.

The ability to place the mandible in a spatial relationship by measuring the masticatory muscles at their rest length can be an important auxiliary tool to assist in the recuperation of condylar fractures.

cartaz1 modificado cartazII modificado

Cervical Dystonia or Spasmodic Torticollis: Positive evolution after Neurophysiological Treatment

The patient of this post contacted me through a derivation from a colleague from abroad.

Soon after he sent an email where he explained the motif for his consultation on Cervical Dystonia or Spasmodic Torticollis, I answered that it was not my

knowledge  area, that I treated TMJ Pathologies , Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics.

The patient insisted, commenting that the colleague that recommended me and knew me from the AACP meeting where I was invited as a lecturer explained to him that he didn´t know if I treated Distonia, but he thought that considering  what he had  watched  I could help him.

I began to study more on  published articles of this field. One of the articles that impacted me was: Spasmodic Torticollis: The Dental Connection. Anthony b. Sims, D.D.S.; Brendan C> Stack, D>D>S> ;MS.;Gary Demererjian, D.D.S.

1

Dystonia is a  neurological movement disorder, which sustained muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. The movements may resemble a tremor. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary movements, and symptoms may “overflow” into adjacent muscles.There are multiple types of dystonia, and numerous diseases and conditions may cause dystonia.

Focal   dystonia:  affects a muscle or group of muscles in a specific part of the body causing involuntary muscular contractions and abnormal postures, like eyes, neck or hands.The precise cause of primary dystonia is unknown .It is suspected to be caused by a pathology of the central nervous system, likely originating in those parts of the brain concerned with motor function, such as the basal ganglia.

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Main common dystonia denomination are :

blepharospasm (from Greek: blepharon, eyelid, and spasm, an uncontrolled muscle contraction), is any abnormal contraction or twitch of the eyelid.

Oromandibular dystonia is a form of focal dystonia affecting the mouth, jaw and tongue, and in this disease it is hard to speak.

Cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis ) affects the muscles of the neck. Causes the head to rotate to one side, to pull down towards the chest, or back, or a combination of these postures.

Spasmodic dysphonia (or laryngeal dystonia) is a voice disorder characterized by involuntary movements or spasms of one or more muscles of the larynx(vocal folds or voice box) during speech.

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Patient Testimony

Everything began approximately after the placement of the  lower implants.

One year after that, I began to feel uncomfortable.

I felt a back and neck stiffness, a strong weight in the back of the head and pain.

I began to make a lot of examination tests with neurologists, physical therapists, rheumatologists, orthopedists.
All of them followed the same line, saying that it could be a stress problem and fatigue.

Later I began to feel a twist movement in my neck towards the left. It was not so strong  but I felt I had no  control on my neck.

My neck always tried to rotate to the left, especially  when I walked and when I tried to hold an object.

After doing physical therapy, chiropractic’s, acupuncture and all those techniques I began to research and finally consulted another neurologist who told me that  I had CERVICAL DYSTONIA.

He asked for many exams to eliminate the possibility of being  a trauma or other problem related to Wilson disease. That hypothesis was soon discarded.

I consulted another neurologist that confirmed the same diagnosis: CERVICAL DYSTONIA.

The neurologist initiated a treatment with Botox, to alleviate, and to relax some muscles, trapeziums, sternocleidomastoids and splenius. I was also oriented to have three applications of miorelaxants.

I began to investigate more on the subject and I found some videos about TMJ and some treatments with dental appliances.

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Habitual patient’s occlusion

Patient Testimony

The situation is very bad because doctors say: “is neurological”,  we don’t know the etiology and it has no cure until today.

I believe all of this must have a relation with the implants, because I passed more than 30 years without these teeth, maybe  the position of my mouth could have provoked some slow alteration that end up in this situation.

I’m not an specialist to affirm that this is the real situation, but I believe that it is worthy to investigate because there is the existence of written articles.

Moreover Dr. Anthony Sims, and other doctors in the dentistry field point for possible head and neck disturbance, motor coordination, Tourette disease or something like that, so many things connected with TMJ (temporomandibular joints) disorders.

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Patient’s occlusal superior and inferior view

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Patient report: Detail of principal symptoms

Impossibility of head stabilization

Ringing ears

Ear compression sensation

Muscle spasm when I want to move the head down and to the right.

Noises in the vertebras in the back of the neck region, may be C1 and C2, but I am not sure and noises in the spine.

Noises in the TMJ, specially when yawn.

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Patient’s panoramic radiograph before treatment.

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Patient’s frontal radiograph where it is clearly seen the impossibility for straight posture of the head.

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Patient’s initial laminography, in habitual occlusion where we can observe the retro position of both mandibular heads.

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Patient’s initial lateral radiograph in habitual occlusion before treatment.

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We can observe in this lateral radiograph and cervical spine radiograph the total lack of space between the ATLAS posterior arc and the Occipital base. I suspected adherences so I solicited a lateral radiograph in flexion.

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In the Cervical Spine radiograph in flexion we can observe a REDUCED space between the ATLAS posterior arc and the base of the occipital. THE SPACE IS REDUCED, BUT EXISTS.

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The MRI in closed mouth shows a small disc, superior facets in both mandibular condyles and bilateral retro discal compression. The patient has no limitation in opening the mouth and the discs are well situated on the mandibular heads when opening. I didn´t judge important to include the image of open mouth for this clinic case.

tHE 13

The Semg dynamic record shows an important asymmetry between anterior right and left temporalis, low activity of both masseters muscles. The trapezius doesn’t show activity during mandibular closing, which is physiologically correct. Important activity from the digastrics muscles in closing movement, which is not physiologically correct.

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The Semg dynamic record shows an important asymmetry between anterior right and left temporalis, low activity of both masseters muscles. The sternocleidomastoid muscles show activity during mandibular closing, which is NOT physiologically correct (the sternocleidomastoid muscle is not a masticatory muscle). Important activity from the digastrics muscles in closing movement, which is NOT physiologically correct.

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His masticatory muscles were electronically deprogrammed with TENS (Transcutaneal Electronic Neural Stimula­tion). A jaw tracker then registered a neurophysiologic position from where an intraoral appliance was constructed and tested with SEMG (Surface Electromyography.) For this record we used the neurophysiologic technique.

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Patient’s frontal comparative images: initial and four months after DIO (Intra Oral Device) wear. Notice the important improvement of head and shoulder posture.

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Patient’s right profile comparative images: initial and four months after DIO (Intra Oral Device) wear. Notice the important improvement of head and shoulder posture.

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Patient’s left profile comparative images: initial and four months after DIO (Intra Oral Device) wear. Notice the important improvement of head and shoulder posture.

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Patient’s lateral radiograph with the device in neurophysiological position. Notice the space between the posterior arc of the atlas and the occipital base that didn´t exist before.

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Patient’s frontal comparative radiograph: before the treatment and with the DIO (Intra Oral Device), the patient manages now to have a straight posture of the head.

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Patient’s lateral and cervical spine comparative radiograph: before the treatment and with the DIO. Notice the space between the posterior arc of the Atlas and the occipital base that did not exist before.

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Patient’s comparative laminographies: initial in habitual occlusion where we can observe the retro position of the mandibular heads and with the intraoral device with retrodiscal decompression.

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Patient’s frontal comparative images: initial, four months and nine months after DIO wear. The patient had a physiological posture recovery.

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Patient’s right profile comparative images: initial, four months and nine months after DIO wear. The patient had a physiological posture recovery.

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Patient’s left profile comparative images: initial, four months and nine months after DIO wear. The patient had a physiological posture recovery.

artigo

Spasmodic Torticollis: The Dental Connection. Anthony b. Sims, D.D.S.; Brendan C> Stack, D>D>S> ;MS.;Gary Demererjian, D.D.S.

 

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The patient also sent videos where he shows his initial incapacity to rotate the head and also comparative videos where he could do that again. The videos are not in the post to preserve patient’s identity.