Reestablishment of the Bone Marrow Signal in a case of Avascular Necrosis of the Mandibular Head. Monitoring two years after treatment.

Preparing a new publication of the TMJ (temporomandibular joint) study and investigation page, I received the new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) that I requested for the patient presented in the last clinical case published.

I decided that it was high priority to publish this follow up before the next clinical case.

Recapitulating the clinical situation and the images of the patient after treatment:

The patient had remission of symptoms.

The patient had improved function and recovered the vertical dimension.

The patient had improved aesthetics (recovering the vertical dimension).

The patient had recovered the mouth opening, without presenting limitation as observed before treatment.

The patient had improved her posture.

Is important to highlight that in this case, with discs of reduced dimensions lying anteriorly displaced WITHOUT REDUCTION when the mouth opened, the goal was to decompress, to recover the vertical dimension, and to wait for the medullary signal recovery by decompression, remembering that all bacteriological and rheumatologic research was negative.

At the end of treatment the MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the patient showed a MEDULAR SIGNAL IMPROVEMENT, yet still far from satisfactory recovery in terms of image, EVEN TAKING INTO ACCOUNT the improvement of symptomatology.

I will post some of the most remarkable initial MRI images before the treatment, to review the clinical case in detail enter in this link.

This publication will emphasis the images, a fundamental tool for understanding what we really can achieve beyond the patient’s clinical improvement.

Understanding the positive or negative changes in the structures affected in TMJ pathologies is critical in the comprehension of the etiology that led to the deterioration of the patient’s structures and consequently triggered the symptoms that affected the quality of life of our patients.

REMEMBERING THAT THIS IMPLIES A DIFFERENTIAL AND UNIQUE DIAGNOSIS FOR EACH CASE.

12 RNM DIREITA INICIAL

MRI: sagittal slice of the right TMJ closed mouth.

There is an irregularity of contour with reduction of the superior aspect of the mandibular condyle, the condyle is ante versioned. There is a small anterior osteophyte.

The articular disc is displaced anteriorly, when the mouth opens.

Presence of subcortical bone cysts in the anterior superior aspect of the mandibular condyle.

13 RNM  ESQ  INICIAL

MRI: sagittal slice of the left TMJ closed mouth. There is a substantial irregularity of contour of the upper portion of the mandibular condyle, with the formation of an anterior osteophyte.

There is a rectification of the articular eminence.

The disc has reduced dimensions lying anteriorly displaced when the mouth opens.

CAN BE SEEN AN IMPORTANT HIPOSSINAL COMPATIBLE WITH AVASCULAR NECROSIS.

Osteonecrosis of the mandible head corresponds to the death of bone tissue also called avascular necrosis.

The alteration in the bone marrow of the mandibular condyle is a possible source of TMJ pain.

To  remember and follow in detail all the images and description of the case report, the reader should return to the previous post.

13A RNM  ESQ  INICIAL

MRI: another sagittal slice of the left TMJ closed mouth.

There is an important  irregularity of contour of the superior aspect of the mandibular condyle and a formation of an anterior osteophyte.

There is a rectification of the articular eminence.

The disc has reduced dimensions lying anteriorly displaced WITHOUT REDUCTION when the mouth opens.

CAN BE SEEN AN IMPORTANT HIPOSSINAL COMPATIBLE WITH AVASCULAR NECROSIS.

Osteonecrosis of the mandible head corresponds to the death of bone tissue also called avascular necrosis.

The alteration in the bone marrow of the mandibular condyle is a possible source of TMJ pain.

To  remember and follow in detail all the images and description of the case report, the reader should return to the previous post.

16A  ESQ boca fechada 2013 T2

MRI:same previous sagittal slice of the left TMJ, closed mouth in T2

MRI in T2 clearly shows the ARTICULAR EFFUSION.

The differential diagnosis of TMJ effusion has a broad spectrum as the effusions in other joints in other parts of the skeleton.

 MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) can give us a lot of information, not just the disc position.

To  remember and follow in detail all the images and description of the case report, the reader should return to the previous post.

CORTE FRONTAL DA ATM ESQ INICIAL ANTES DO TRATAMENTO 2

MRI, frontal section of the left TMJ, closed mouth.

CAN BE SEEN AN IMPORTANT HIPOSSINAL COMPATIBLE WITH AVASCULAR NECROSIS.

Avascular necrosis occurs when blood flow to a bone is interrupted or reduced. It can be caused by various conditions, such as bone or joint damage, PRESSURE INSIDE THE BONE and other medical conditions.

The condyle affected by avascular necrosis has low signal on T1-weighted images as a result of edematous changes in trabecular bone.

Osteonecrosis of the condylar head corresponds to the death of bone tissue, also called avascular necrosis.

 Alteration in the bone marrow of the mandibular condyle is a possible source of TMJ pain.

CORTE FRONTAL DA ATM DIR INICIAL ANTES DO TRATAMENTO

MRI, frontal section of the right TMJ closed mouth. Upper lesion in the right mandibular condyle, as described in the same sagittal slice of the same condyle as subcortical bone cysts.

To  remember and follow in detail all the images and description of the case report, the reader should return to the previous post.

In the last publication WERE POSTED THE INITIAL IMAGES BEFORE TREATMENT AND THE IMAGES AFTER TREATMENT.

IN THIS PUBLICATION I POSTED THE IMAGES COMPARING: before treatment, after treatment and TWO-YEARS FOLLOW-UP AFTER neurophysiological treatment.

FRONTAL COMPARATIVAS DIREITA 2016

T1-weighted right frontal images comparison: before treatment, after treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

We can see the improvement in the medullary signal of the left condyle and the improvement of the superior cortical bone. THE THIRD IMAGE HAS NO TRACES OF THE SUBCORTICAL LESION .

FRONTAL COMPARATIVAS ESQUERDA 2016

T1-weighted left frontal images comparison: before treatment, after treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

We can see the improvement in medullary signal of the left condyle in the central image and THE  BONE MEDULLARY RECOVERY IN THE THIRD IMAGE.

THE MANDIBULAR CONDYLE HAS A HELTHY BONE MARROW SIGNAL.

RESS COMP DIREITAS SAGITAL 2016

T1-weighted right sagittal images closed mouth comparison: before treatment, after treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

We can see the improvement of the medullary signal and cortical bone. ABSENCE OF SUBCORTICAL BONE CYSTS in the anterior superior aspect of the mandibular condyle OBSERVED IN THE FIRST IMAGE before treatment. Improvement in the cortical bone of the mandibular head.

sagitais comparativas T2

T2-weighted right sagittal images comparison: before treatment, after treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

It is clear in the first image the inflammatory signal. In the central image we can notice the improvement of the intramedullary signal and the remission of posterior effusion.

IN THE THIRD IMAGE WE CAN SEE THE TOTAL REMISSION OF THE INFLAMMATORY SIGNAL.

The patient DID NOT USE ANY ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUG.

RESS COMP SAGITAL ESQ 2016

T1-weighted left sagittal images comparison: before treatment, after treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

We can see the improvement in medullary signal of the left condyle in the central image and THE  BONE MARROW RECOVERY IN THE THIRD IMAGE.

THE MANDIBULAR CONDYLE HAS A HELTHY BONE MARROW SIGNAL.

FINAL 1

All relevant images were posted, nevertheless I think it is important to highlight THIS FRONTAL RIGHT TMJ comparative image because of the MEDULLARY SIGNAL OBVIOUSNESS.

The first image before treatment and the second two years of follow-up after treatment. MEDULLARY BONE WITH AVASCULAR NECROSIS RECOVERED IN A HEALTHY MEDULLARY SIGNAL.

Avascular necrosis occurs when blood flow to a bone is interrupted or reduced. It can be caused by various conditions, such as bone or joint damage, PRESSURE INSIDE THE BONE and other medical conditions.

The differential diagnosis of the alteration in signal intensity of the mandibular condyle begins with the knowledge of the normal characteristics of medullary signal.

FINAL menor

Right and left TMJ sagittal and frontal comparative slices. Before treatment and two years of follow-up after neurophysiological treatment.

finale finale

To  remember and follow in detail all the images and description of the case report, the reader should return to the previous post.

In the previous publication the control images after two years of treatment were NOT posted.

With the application of advanced diagnostic techniques like MRI the alterations of the medullary signal from the mandibular condyle can be detected, similar to those seen in the femoral head with osteonecrosis.

The detection of effusion and bone marrow alterations is important information before the treatment.

 The information of what really we achieve after our treatments in the image beyond the clinical improvement of our patient is also substantial information.

In this case showing the improvement and recuperation of the medullar signal with the correct mandibular reposition and decompression.

2 thoughts on “Reestablishment of the Bone Marrow Signal in a case of Avascular Necrosis of the Mandibular Head. Monitoring two years after treatment.

  1. Pingback: TMJ Study and Investigation Page. Three years of publication. | Page of Studies and Investigation – TMJ

  2. Pingback: Reversão da Alteração da Medular Óssea em um caso de Necrose Avascular da cabeça mandibular. Acompanhamento de dois anos após o tratamento. | Pagina de estudos e investigação da ATM

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